Friday, 19 June 2009

Monday, 1 June 2009

Daphnis and Chloe, The Music Lesson preview

Just the arms, heads, dog's tail and dog's leg! 42 bits!








A preview of this work which is taking much longer than I ever imagined"
The arms, heads, dogs tail and leg account for 42 pieces of mould and the bodies will be at least 35 each so my original estimate of a 35 piece mould for the whole thing was a little "short". Each one takes ages to do, so I have decide to go for a July launch in London at the AFAS exhibition at the Mall Galleries. It will be slip cast in Parian ware (the French once did a version of it which is explained here though the English were equal if not better at it! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis-Simon_Boizot)

I have done a portrait using this exquisite material. This one, my first double figure with animal, if it works, will spore a few more from the Daphnis/Chloe story. I think the reason that this material was abandoned in the 1920 was the cost in skilled "person" hours. It really is time consuming hence my lack of e communication since Christmas!!

Background

"The Music Lesson"
Daphnis is teaching Chloe to play the pan pipes. Daphnis, being very shy about showing too much affection in case he is rejected, snatches the pipe back to kiss them where her lips have been. She pinches him above the hip (as in the Laocoon) her fingers pressing into his skin (as Bernini's Pluto and Proserpina), their knees touch and, no doubt a heart or two will "flutter". The dog looks on with suspicion!

Thursday, 16 October 2008

Harry R Mileham Chapel Royal Brighton


Grandfather's Triptych paintings in The Chapel Royal Brighton.


Monday, 28 April 2008

Running out of space

A Marble Ice Breaker has to go outside. Too many dogs and horses in the studio!

Tuesday, 26 February 2008

Sunday, 24 February 2008

Sculpture of Stallion Work In Progress













Quick look at my Stallion, a seriously satisfying commission. It is particularly good to have a shared passion for subject with one's Patron. Happy 21st Birthday.

Tuesday, 5 February 2008

Henry Holiday

It’s wonderful to see Gilbert Holiday’s father has made it to that French Site. http://printwomen.blogspot.com/2008/02/henry-holiday-1839-1927.html